Serious TikTok: Can You Learn About the Holocaust in 60 seconds? 

In this month’s post, Dr. Tobias Ebbrecht-Hartmann and Tom Divon, Hebrew University, Jerusalem explore multimodal education and commemoration of the Holocaust on today’s most popular social media platform. In less than a year, the trending short-video platform TikTok transformed from a mostly entertaining environment for lip-syncing, dancing, and other self-performances into an interest-based platform forContinue reading “Serious TikTok: Can You Learn About the Holocaust in 60 seconds? “

2021 – A Year in Review

2021 continued to be a challenging year balancing the demands of administrative and teaching duties during the pandemic with research and public engagement. Nevertheless, the Digital Holocaust Memory Project did reach some major milestones throughout the year. Below is a brief overview of the project’s successes in 2021. Holocaust Memorial Day The first 6 weeksContinue reading “2021 – A Year in Review”

Digital Tools for Understanding the Holocaust: Visualisations in the EHRI Document Blog

In this month’s guest blog, Barnabas Balint reflects on the relationship between the digital and the material archive in his attempts to help others engage with sources related to his research. In July 2021, I (Barnabas) published a piece for the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure’s Document Blog, an experimental space for researchers to share interestingContinue reading “Digital Tools for Understanding the Holocaust: Visualisations in the EHRI Document Blog”

Why (not) so serious? Anne Frank memes and digital Holocaust memory

In this month’s guest blog, Juan Manuel González Aguilar and Mykola Makhortykh offer an analysis of the different types of Anne Frank memes circulating online. Please be advised that this blog includes images that are offensive. They are included here for their importance in increasing public understanding of online Holocaust denial, distortion and trivalisation. TheContinue reading “Why (not) so serious? Anne Frank memes and digital Holocaust memory”

Playing the Holocaust – Part II

In late 2020, we hosted an academic discussion about the Holocaust and computer games called Playing the Holocaust – Part I. As a follow-up to that event, in early 2021, we brought together a variety of speakers working on the creation of such projects. Below you can watch the speaker’s presentations from this event andContinue reading “Playing the Holocaust – Part II”